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Calendar

SPRING SEMESTER 2018:

Thursday, April 19, 5:30 - 7 p.m., Room L140, Conrad Elvehjem Building. Center for East Asian Studeslecture by University of California Santa Cruz Historian Gail Hershatter, “Domestic Cosmopolitanism: Rethinking Gender and Social Change in Republican China.” In this lecture, Dr. Hershatter will look at how to re-create the world of women who left no trace in the public record. Using examples of domestic cosmopolitanism, Dr. Hershatter will discuss connections between China's twentieth-century transnational involvments and the lives of elite women who did not leave home. This talk is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies, the Harvey Goldberg Center for the Study of Contemporary History, the Department of History, and the Department of Gender & Women's Studies, with financial support from the University Lectures Knapp Fund.

RESCHEDULED TO APRIL 25 (same time and place and topic) DUE TO WEATHER CONDITIONS:

Wednesday, April 18, 6-7:30 p.m., Room 206, Ingraham Hall, 1155 ObservatoryDrive. Final Bubble Tea of the year (please note that this event will be on WEDNESDAY). This student-led event (organized by the Asian American Student Union, with tea and snacks by the Asian Sweet Bakery) will feature a panel on "Asian American Representation and Experiences in the Workplace," with the following panelists:

  • Loren Kuzuhara, Business School Management Professor
  • Xiaoyang Long, Business School Operations Professor
  • Ella Mae Matsumura, Business School Accounting Professor
  • Joan Fujimura, Sociology Professor
  • James J. Li, Psychology Professor
  • Yi Jiang, UW alum now working at Epic

Tuesday, April 10, 4-5:30 p.m., Room 115, Van Hise Building. Free public lecture by Halls-Bascom Visiting Fellow Robin Yates of McGill University, "Despot or Failed Sage? The First Emperor of China, the Qin Empire and Historical Reality." This talk is sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages & Cultures and the Center for East Asian Studies.

Monday, April 9, 3:30 - 5 p.m., Room 220, Teacher education Building (225 North Mills Street), talk by UW education alum Weili Zhao, now at Chinese University of Hong Kong, on Confucius and international education.  The lecture title is, "Re-Invigorating the Being of Language in International Educational Studies: Unpacking Confucius' 'Wind-Pedagogy' in Yijing as an exemplar." Sponsored by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the Wisconsin China Initiative and the Center for East Asian Studies.

Tuesday, April 3, 4 p.m., Ingraham 206.  "Media and Communication in Contemporary China." The Center for East Asian Studies will host a panel of visiting scholars from China speaking about their research on contemporary China, including discussions of recent China-based social surveys, the case of Greenpeace in China, a study of Southern Metropolis Daily 南方都市报 newspaper, and moreModerated by UW-Madison Communication Arts Professor Zhongdang Pan.

Wednesday, March 7, 4:30 p.m., Elvehjem Building Room L140 (Chazen Museum), screening of "Behemoth 悲兮魔兽," by documentarian Zhao Liang 赵亮. "The dehumanising impact of coal mining is laid bare in a Chinese documentary whose stunning images speak louder than words." Chinese with English subtitles. Panel discussion with UW-Madison faculty will follow the screnning of this 90-minute film.Sponsored by the Wisconsin China Initiative and the Center for East Asian Studies.

Monday, Feb. 12 – noon, 1418 Van Hise Hall.  Third of three Chinese literature lectures sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.  “Annals of the Theater 戏剧春秋: The Agency of Actresses on the Page and the Stage,” by Megan Ammirati, University of California-Davis.

Monday, Feb. 5, noon, 1418 Van Hise Hall. Second of three Chinese literature lectures sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.  “Graphs, Numbers, and Narratives: The Making of Fictional Realism in Modern China” by Anatoly Detwyler, Columbia University.

Thursday, Jan. 25, noon, 206 Ingraham Hall.  Lecture by Bart Édes, North American representative for the Asian Development Bank, “Development Challenges in Asia.”  This talk is sponsored by the Institute for Regional and International Studies.

Monday, Jan. 29, noon, 1418 Van Hise Hall. First of three Chinese literature lectures sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures. “Queer Anti-Capital Narratives of Queer Migration Across the Sinophone World” by Alvin K. Wong, Yonsei University.

Thursday, Jan. 25, noon, 422 North Hall. Political Science Professor Margaret E. Roberts of UC-San Diego will be presenting material from her forthcoming book, Censored: Distraction and Diversion Inside China's Great Firewall, due out April 2018 by Princeton University Press. According to the promotional materials, "Roberts finds that much of censorship in China works not by making information impossible to access but by requiring those seeking information to spend extra time and money for access. By inconveniencing users, censorship diverts the attention of citizens and powerfully shapes the spread of information...Drawing parallels between censorship in China and the way information is manipulated in the United States and other democracies, Roberts reveals how Internet users are susceptible to control even in the most open societies." This talk is a joint session of the Department of Political Science's Political Economy and Comparative Politics colloquiums.

 

Fall Semester 2017:

Thursday, Nov. 30, 3:30 – 5 p.m., Red Gym.  Free public lecture by Zach Fredman, “The ‘Jeep Girl’ Crisis of 1945: American servicemen and Chinese women in wartime China.”  Zach Fredman will discuss how friction over sexual relations between GIs and Chinese women poisoned ties between American servicemen and the Chinese during the final year of the Pacific War. Backlash against GIs and “Jeep girls,” the derisive nickname used to refer to women who fraternized with American servicemen, compelled Chiang Kai-shek and General Albert Wedemeyer, commander of US forces, to take action. Dr. Fredman, a postdoctoral student at Dartmouth, has received several awards for his work on US servicemen in China during WWII, including the Coffman award for military history and also the Unterberger prize for US foreign relations.  This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Center for East Asian Studies.

Tuesday, Nov. 28, 6-8:30 p.m., Room 3250 (Appellate Courtroom) of the Law School.  Free public screening and discussion with the director of “The Chinese Mayor,” a documentary in Chinese with English subtitles.  Director Zhou Hao will attend the screening and offer comments afterwards in Chinese, with a Q&A time to follow.  The film has an 86-minute run time and the following description: Once a thriving capital in imperial China, the city of Datong 大同lies in near ruins by 2013, ranked as the most polluted city in the country. Mayor Geng Yanbo耿彦波has a bold new plan to turn his coal-mining city into a tourist haven.  That will require pulling down 14,000 households and relocating 500,000 residents, all to make way for a restored city wall. This event is co-sponsored by the Wisconsin China Initiative, the East Asian Legal Studies Center and Project Pengyou, and organized by the student organization, the Yuan Shan Study Society. 

Tuesday, Nov. 7, noon – 1 p.m., 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive.  Public lecture by UW-Madison Law Professor Mark Sidel, China's New Legal and Political Framework for Controlling Foreign NGOs and Foundations: Design and Implementation.”  Prior to 2016, China’s management of foreign NGOs and foundations was uneven and even occasionally relaxed for an authoritarian country. But last May, authority and management of foreign NGOs and foundations in China was moved to the Ministry of Public Security, under a new Overseas NGO Law and a political policy that has brought significant change to the work of foreign organizations in China. This talk outlines these new policies and their initial effects on foreign NGOs and foundations in China.  Mark Sidel is Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research and writing focus on the nonprofit sector and philanthropy (with a focus on Asia and the United States); law and development; comparative law; and human trafficking. The Nov. 7 lecture will be the second of three talks in the Center for East Asian Studies fall semester series.

Monday, November 6, 3:30 p.m., 212 University Club Building. Lecture by UW-Madison History Professor Joseph Dennis, "Songs to Engourage the Cessation of Litigation: Printing, Orality, and the Legal Knowledge in China, 1595-1949." This presentation is part of the weekly seminars series for the Institute for Research in the Humanities. The campus community is welcome to join the presentations and follow-up discussions. Professor Dennis is one of seven resident faculty fellows at the Institute this academic year.

Tuesday, Oct. 24, 5:30-8 p.m., Pyle Center, 702 Langdon Street, National China Town Hall program will feature a webcast with Ambassador Susan Rice, followed by a local presentation (to be determined).  This annual event is sponsored by the National Committee on US-China Relations and by the Madison Committee on Foreign Relations.  Click here to register.  Cost is $10 for students and $20 for guests. Buffet will be served.

Thursday, Sept. 28– 4 p.m., Pyle Center. Live recording of a Sinica Podcast, “African Lives in China.” Discussion of Guangzhou's African community and how China's growing involvement with Africa impacts Africans in China. The podcast will feature Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn, co-founders of the Sinica Podcast, together with Professor Lina Benabdallah (see below).  This event is sponsored by the African Studies Program.

Wednesday, Sept. 27, 12 noon, 206 Ingraham Hall. Public lecture by Wake Forest Politics Professor Lina Benabdallah, "Professionalization Trainings in China-Africa Relations: Power-Knowledge Nexus." This lecture is part of the "Africa at Noon" series sponsored by the African Studies Program.

Monday, Sept. 25, 3:30 p.m., 212 University Club Building. Lecture by UW-Madison Art History Professor Yuhang Li, "Reproducing a Bodhisattva: Women's Artistic Devotion in Late Imperial China." This presentation is part of the weekly seminars series for the Institute for Research in the Humanities. The campus community is welcome to join the presentations and follow-up discussions. Professor Li is one of seven resident faculty fellows at the Institute this academic year.

Friday, Sept. 22, 3:30 – 5 p.m., Room 213 of the Pyle Center. The Center for East Asian Studies, together with the departments of History and of Political Science, will host a public event, “Roundtable on the North Korea Crisis.”  How did we reach this point and what are the implications of Japan, China, and international relations? Panelists will include the following four faculty from UW-Madison: historians Charles Kim and Louise Young, joined by political scientists Eunsook Jung and Andrew Kydd. The public is welcome - coffee and cookies will be served at 3 p.m., with the roundtable beginning at 3:30.

Friday, Sept. 22, 3-4 p.m., 336 Ingraham Hall. -- A representative of the Hopkins-Nanjing Center will hold an information session on its graduate programs in China. This center was established in 1986 as an academic partnership between Nanjing University and the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.  Student applicants should be proficient in Chinese and English.  Courses focus on Chinese and American studies, international law, politics, economics,and energy resources/environment.  The program offers one-year certificates and two-year master's degrees in international studies. For a one-on-one appointment, students can contact Madelyn Ross at mross35@jhu.edu

Friday, Sept. 22, 12 noon – 1:30 p.m., 206 Ingraham Hall.  Free public lecture by UW-Madison History Professor Alfred W. McCoy, “Showdown in the South China Seas: Beijing and Washington Struggle for Dominion over the ‘World Island.’” Using Sir Halford Mackinder’s seminal 1904 treatise that both created the study of “geopolitics” and identified the “world island” as the pivot for global power, this presentation sees current tensions arising from rival superpower strategies for the exercise of global power. This talk is part of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum series.

Friday, Sept. 15, noon - 1:30 p.m., 206 Ingraham Hall, Bradley Davis, "From China to Vietnam: Trade and Ethnicity in the Nineteenth Century." Sponsored by the Center for Southeast Asian Studies.

Saturday, Sept. 9, 2-3 p.m., The Red Gym (716 Langdon Street). Project Pengyou (a student organization) and the Wisconsin China Initiative will host a welcome back session that will feature a panel of upper classmen talking about life on campus. RSVP by Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/ProjectPengyouMadison/

Friday, Sept. 1 - 10-11:30 a.m., 336 Ingraham Hall. Coffee time for new students, sponsored by the Wisconsin China Initiative. Drop by and say hello while enjoying a cup of coffee.

 

SPRING SEMESTER 2017:

Saturday and Sunday, May 27-28 - The Wisconsin China Initiative will host a new orientation program in China for newly-admitted freshmen. More details coming soon...

Saturday, April 29 – 11 a.m., Overture Center in the Wisconsin Studio, 201 State Street. “UW Meets China Banquet.” Join CLACC (the Chinese Language & Culture Club) along with alumni, and faculty for an afternoon luncheon. The event will include speeches from fellow alumni, networking, and recognition of high achieving students. RSVP through Eventbrite.  Tickets range from $18 to $42.

Thursday, April 27, noon – 1:30 p.m., Lubar Commons (Room 7200), Law School.  Public lecture on trade law in the Asian Pacific region (lecture title will be coming soon) by UW economics alum John Mullen.  Dr. Mullen is a senior advisor specializing on trade and investment at McLarty Associates in Washington D.C., and an adjust professor in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  A light lunch buffet will be provided.  This lecture is sponsored by the East Asian Legal Studies Center and the Wisconsin China Initiative.  Following his Law School talk, Dr. Mullen will be the featured speaker at the monthly meeting of the Madison Committee on Foreign Relations, starting at 5:30 p.m. at the Madison Club.  Register for his lecture, “American Interests in the Asia Pacific: Trade, Geopolitics, and Relations with China in the Trump Era” (tickets cost $10-$20) for the evening lecture via the MCFR website.

Wednesday, April 26 – 6:30 p.m., Room L150, Conrad A Elvehjem Building, 800 University Avenue.  Second screening for the Chinese Exclusion Act documentary.  See details above for April 24.

Tuesday, April 25 – 4 p.m., DeLuca Forum, Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard Street. The Wisconsin China Initiative will host a panel discussion about the Chinese Exclusion Act and its relevance to today.  The filmmakers, Ric Burns and Li-Shin Yu of Steeplechase Films will speak at 4 p.m. on “Why This Film Matters.”  Then starting at 5:15 p.m. there will be a panel, “Who is American? The continuing impact of the Chinese Exclusion Act” featuring award-winning author, journalist and activist Helen Zia joined by UW Asian American Studies Faculty Victor Jew and UW Law Professor Asifa Quraishi-Landes. RSVP through Eventbrite, the WCI Facebook page, or by email to ldennis@eastasia.wisc.edu

Monday, April 24 – 6 p.m., Marquee Cinema, Union South.  Free public screening of a new documentary on the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882.    Stay for pizza and Q&A with the directors after the film.  (A second screening will be held April 26, see below for details.) Produced by award-winning documentary filmmakers Ric Burns and Li-Shin Yu of Steeplechase Films and the Center for Asian American Media as part of PBS series American Experience, this documentary examines America’s complicated relationship with immigration and what it means to be American.  The uncut film will be shown in Madison prior to the PBS premier.  Register on Eventbrite and find more information on the WCI homepage. 

Monday, April 24 – 3 p.m., Room 267, Teacher Education Building.  Public lecture, “Political Moral Education in China,” by Professor Caiping Sun, Deputy Director, Institute of Moral Education, Nanjing Normal University.

Wednesday, April 18 – 12 noon, 336 Ingraham Hall.  The Center for East Asian Studies lecture series will conclude for the spring semester with a talk by UW History doctoral candidate Zhijun Ren, "Envisioning Early Modern in East Asia: Locality, Region and Empire in the Writings of Korean Tributary Missions"  Tea and snacks will be served. 

Monday, April 17 – 4:30 – 5:30 p.m., 336 Ingraham Hall.  Final Bubble Tea Monday of the spring semester.  This event will feature discussion of the UW and China.  Bubble Tea Mondays are sponsored by the Wisconsin China Initiative.

Saturday, April 15 – 8 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.  The 2017 Midwest Chinese Speech Contest and the International Forum on Chinese Language Education will be hosted for the first time by the UW-Madison. The forum will run from 8 a.m. until noon in Room 6210 of the Social Sciences building, followed by the speech contest from noon until 5:30 p.m., ending with a banquet. The US Midwest “Chinese Bridge” Speech Contest is an annual event open to all students in the Midwest and Great Lakes area.  Heritage speakers who came to the U.S. prior to age 13 can also join the contest.  Co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Department of Asian Languages & Cultures, the Center for East Asian Studies, Language Institute, and the Chinese Language & Culture Club.  The UW-Madison faculty host is Professor Hongming Zhang. 

Friday, April 14 – 3:30 – 5 p.m., 6210 Social Sciences.  Free public talk, “Sino-US Relations at a New Starting Point,” by Hong Lei 洪磊, Consul General of China, Chicago Consul.  Mr. Hong is the former Foreign Ministry Spokesperson for the People’s Republic of China.  A reception will follow his talk.  This event is sponsored by CEAS, the Dept. of Asian Languages & Cultures, the Chinese Faculty Association, the Chinese Students & Scholars Association, and CLACC.

Friday, April 14 – noon – 1:30 p.m., 1820 Van Hise Hall.  Free public lecture, “Modern Chinese Scalar Constructions,” by Chaofen Sun 孙朝奋, Professor or East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University.  Pizza and coffee will be provided.  This event is sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages & Cultures, CEAS, CLACC and the Y.R. Chao Foundation.

Thursday, April 13 – 5 p.m., Room 5208, Social Sciences Building.  Public lecture, “Nature of Language Acquisition: Argumentation from Chinese Language Education,” by Yang Zhao 杨赵,Professor and Dean, School of Chinese as a Second Language, Peking University, Beijing, China.  This event was made possible by a University Lectures grant, and is sponsored by the Department of Asian Languages & Cultures, the Center for East Asian Studies and the Chinese Language & Culture Club.

Monday, April 10, 4:30-5:30 p.m., 336 Ingraham Hall.  Bubble Tea Monday will feature Math Professor Tonghai Yang talking about the Anhui-based charity he established: the Hometown Education Foundation. Bubble Tea Mondays are sponsored by the Wisconsin China Initiative.

Monday, April 3 - 6 p.m., Room L140, Elvehjem Building (800 University Avenue, part of the Chazen Museum of Art).  Screening of a documentary, “My Life in China,” by Asian American film-maker Kenneth Eng, followed by a talk with Mr. Eng. This film discusses issues related to immigration, the pressure to assimilate, the struggle of refugees, and sacrifices made by parents, and what it means to be both Chinese and American.

Monday, March 27 - 3:30 p.m., Room 336 (Third Floor), Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive. "Beijing Badgers: a conversation about how Tsinghua 清华 served as a conduit to UW-Madison for early 1900s students form China." Wisconsin China Initiative Director Jerry Yin will be talking with special guest Yun Liu 刘昀. Mr. Liu is the nephew of Tsinghua/Peking University Ecohomist Chen Daisun 陈岱孙 (1900-1997), Uw alum, Class of 1922. The history conversation will be followed by a Bubble Tea Monday event at 4:30 (see below for more info) in the same location, featuring a UW-China history quiz.

March 16 – 4 p.m., Room 159 “Wisconsin Idea Room,” Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall.  CANCELED DUE TO WEATHER which prevented our speakers from flying out of the East Coast. (Plans are to reschedule for the fall semester 2017.) Live recording of a Sinica Podcast, “China and Africa in a Post-Fact World.”  The Podcase will feature Kaiser Kuo and Jeremy Goldkorn, co-founders of the Sinica Podcast, along with Sean Jacobs, founder of “Africa is a Country.”  This event is sponsored by the African Studies Program. After the Podcast, the WCI will sponsor pizza and time for Q&A with the speakers.

Monday, March 6, 4:30 p.m., Ingraham Hall's room 325. WCI's new "Bubble Tea Mondays" series starts. Events will run every Monday through April 17 and feature conversation and comaradery on the them of the Chinese experience at UW-Madison.

Thursday, March 2 - 3:30 p.m., 313 University Club. Public lecture by Historian Jonathan Schlesinger, Indiana University, "An Inside-Out View of Qing Environmental History." This talk is sponsored by the History Department and the Nelson Institute's Center for Culture, History and the Environment.

Tuesday, Feb. 7 – 12 noon, Law School’s Lubar Commons (Room 7200). Public lecture, “Trump Ascendant, the U.S. in Decline, and the New World Order: Implications for U.S. economic relations with East Asia,” by UW Emeritus Law Professor Charles Irish.  Light refreshments will be served.  Professor Irish founded the Law School’s East Asian Legal Studies Center in 1990, and currently serves as its Senior Director Emeritus.  He is also the Sherwood R. Volkman-Bascom Distinguished Teacher Professor of Law Emeritus.

Friday, Feb. 3 – 12 noon – 1:30 p.m., 206 Ingraham Hall.  The Center for Southeast Asian Studies’ Friday Forum lecture will be by UW historian Shelly Chan, “Histories that Don’t Fit: The Chinese ‘South Seas’ and its End in the Twentieth Century.”   This talk asks how Chinese diaspora histories across the “South Seas” (Nanyang)—a maritime region connecting East and Southeast Asia from its height in the 1920s to its end in the 1960s—may help advance the understanding of trans-Asia. The rise and demise of the Chinese “South Seas” suggest that diaspora can be better understood as temporal fragments intersecting with other temporalities of human action, sometimes cropping up and ripping through the telos of the nation. Shelly Chan is Assistant Professor of History at UW-Madison focusing on transnational and global China and Asia.

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ARCHIVE

CLICK HERE to see the archive for Fall Semester 2016 events.

CLICK HERE to see the archive for Spring Semester 2016 events.

CLICK HERE to see the archive for Fall Semester 2015 events.

CLICK HERE to see the archive for Spring Semester 2015 events.

CLICK HERE to see the archive for Fall Semester 2014 events.

CLICK HERE to see the archive for Spring Semester 2014 events.

CLICK HERE to see the archive of Fall Semester 2013 events.

Please send your calendar ideas to ldennis@international.wisc.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



Copyright © 2011 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.

Wisconsin China Initiative, Division of International Studies, 500 Lincoln Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

phone: 608.265.6640 email: ldennis@international.wisc.edu